“All I can do is go to her and ask her about it, when she denies it, what am I supposed to do? It’s my mom.” This situation and statement from Tiawanda Foucha’s ex-husband is all too familiar for daughter-in-laws, and ironically was recently discussed on an episode of Divorce Court. Which brings me to the title of this blog post, “Rite of Passage.” The show introduced Tiawanda and Tyron Foucha, who were recently divorced but contemplating getting remarried. Both were 27 years old, have 3 children together and had been together for 12 years. According to Tiawanda, her family welcomed Tyron with open arms, yet his family, i.e. his mother, did not, and was never welcoming from the beginning of their courtship. Three kids later, and Tyron has to tell his mother and sister to acknowledge and speak to Tiawanda when they come to HER house to visit HER kids. I think most people are saying to themselves right now that Tiawanda is a better person than they are because the mom and sister wouldn’t step foot through the door if they had a problem acknowledging the lady of the house. Her problem is his inability to step up, translation, have her back and put her first. His problem is he feels she’s forcing him to choose. To him, the situation is no big deal and something she just needs to get over. And like so many DILs, Tiawanda is screaming inside. The mother’s disdain and discontentment was further revealed during their wedding. The new “Mother-in-Law” didn’t give a gift, a hug, any acknowledgement or congratulations at all to her new daughter-in-law; another all too familiar scenario for some DILs. To her she hadn’t inherited a daughter, but had lost her son to the other woman. It’s interesting how … Continue reading